My name is tosawa, and i from Indonesia, and literally now in Addis Ababa Ethiopia.
  • Personal Branding Marketing at Ethiopia
  • Lives in Addis Ababa
  • From Ethiopia
  • Studied UMJ at Indonesia University
    Class of Master
  • Male
  • Single
  • 06/09/1992
  • Followed by 200 people
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  • I Never beg a women for love, but...
    I Never beg a women for love, but...
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  • #pokerface
    #pokerface
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  • Yellow Claw - Invitation (Feat. Yade Lauren)
    Yellow Claw - Invitation (Feat. Yade Lauren)
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  • It is only when you meet someone of a different culture from
    yourself that you begin to realise what your own beliefs really are. —
    I knew exactly where my extended investigation of habits would begin.
    For years, I’ve kept a list of my
    “Secrets of Adulthood,”
    which are the lessons I’ve learned with time and experience. Some are serious, such as
    “Just because something is fun for someone else doesn’t mean it’s fun for me,”
    and some are goofy, such as
    “Food tastes better when I eat with my hands.”
    One of my most important Secrets of Adulthood, however, is: “I’m more like other people, and less like other people, than I suppose.”
    While I’m not much dierent from other people, those dierences are very important.
    For this reason, the same habit strategies don’t work for everyone. If we know ourselves, we’re able to manage ourselves better, and if we’re trying to work with others, it helps to understand them.
    So I would start with self-knowledge, by identifying how my nature aects my habits. Figuring that out, however, isn’t easy. As novelist John Updike observed,
    “Surprisingly few clues are ever oered us as to what kind of people we are.”
    In my research, I’d looked for a good framework to explain dierences in how people respond to habits, but to my surprise, none existed. Was I the only one who wondered why some people adopt habits much more, or less, readily than other people? Or why
    some people dread habits? Or why some people are able to keep certain habits, in certain situations, but not others?
    I couldn’t gure out the pattern—then one afternoon, eureka. The answer didn’t emerge from my library research, but from my preoccupation with the question my friend had asked me. I’d been pondering, yet again, her simple observation: she’d never missed practice for her high school track team, but she can’t make herself go running now. Why?
    As my idea hit, I felt the same excitement that Archimedes must have felt when he stepped into his bath. Suddenly I grasped it. The rst and most important habits question is: “How does a person respond to an expectation?” When we try to form a new habit, we set an expectation for ourselves. Therefore, it’s crucial to understand how we respond to expectations.
    We face two kinds of expectations: outer expectations (meet work deadlines, observe trac regulations) and inner expectations (stop napping, keep a New Year’s resolution). From my observation, just about everyone falls into one of four distinct groups:
    Upholders respond readily to both outer expectations and inner expectations.
    Questioners question all expectations, and will meet an expectation only if they believe it’s justied.
    Obligers respond readily to outer expectations but struggle to meet inner expectations (my friend on the track team).
    Rebels resist all expectations, outer and inner alike.
    #tosawa
    It is only when you meet someone of a different culture from yourself that you begin to realise what your own beliefs really are. — I knew exactly where my extended investigation of habits would begin. For years, I’ve kept a list of my “Secrets of Adulthood,” which are the lessons I’ve learned with time and experience. Some are serious, such as “Just because something is fun for someone else doesn’t mean it’s fun for me,” and some are goofy, such as “Food tastes better when I eat with my hands.” One of my most important Secrets of Adulthood, however, is: “I’m more like other people, and less like other people, than I suppose.” While I’m not much dierent from other people, those dierences are very important. For this reason, the same habit strategies don’t work for everyone. If we know ourselves, we’re able to manage ourselves better, and if we’re trying to work with others, it helps to understand them. So I would start with self-knowledge, by identifying how my nature aects my habits. Figuring that out, however, isn’t easy. As novelist John Updike observed, “Surprisingly few clues are ever oered us as to what kind of people we are.” In my research, I’d looked for a good framework to explain dierences in how people respond to habits, but to my surprise, none existed. Was I the only one who wondered why some people adopt habits much more, or less, readily than other people? Or why some people dread habits? Or why some people are able to keep certain habits, in certain situations, but not others? I couldn’t gure out the pattern—then one afternoon, eureka. The answer didn’t emerge from my library research, but from my preoccupation with the question my friend had asked me. I’d been pondering, yet again, her simple observation: she’d never missed practice for her high school track team, but she can’t make herself go running now. Why? As my idea hit, I felt the same excitement that Archimedes must have felt when he stepped into his bath. Suddenly I grasped it. The rst and most important habits question is: “How does a person respond to an expectation?” When we try to form a new habit, we set an expectation for ourselves. Therefore, it’s crucial to understand how we respond to expectations. We face two kinds of expectations: outer expectations (meet work deadlines, observe trac regulations) and inner expectations (stop napping, keep a New Year’s resolution). From my observation, just about everyone falls into one of four distinct groups: Upholders respond readily to both outer expectations and inner expectations. Questioners question all expectations, and will meet an expectation only if they believe it’s justied. Obligers respond readily to outer expectations but struggle to meet inner expectations (my friend on the track team). Rebels resist all expectations, outer and inner alike. #tosawa
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  • Thank you Chatopia and Natnael_Tesfaye
    Thank you [Chatopia] and [Natnael_Tesfaye]
    9
    4 Comments 1 Shares
  • I will invite u all for #jerusalemachallenge #chatopia friends 👍🇪🇹
    I will invite u all for #jerusalemachallenge #chatopia friends 👍🇪🇹
    7
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  • Hola 😊
    Hola 😊
    7
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  • ግሩም ... ከኪስ ቦርሳ chatopia.org #ethiopiasmart ንግድ አደርጋለሁ
    ግሩም ... ከኪስ ቦርሳ chatopia.org #ethiopiasmart ንግድ አደርጋለሁ
    6
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  • I I am very happy to associate with Muslim ethiopia .. ethiopia is a country with the most religions in the world and really respect other religions .. thanks god #ethiopia #harmonyindiversity
    I I am very happy to associate with Muslim ethiopia .. ethiopia is a country with the most religions in the world and really respect other religions .. thanks god #ethiopia #harmonyindiversity
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  • እነሱ በኢትዮጵያ ውስጥ እጅግ በጣም ጥሩ አስተማሪዎች ናቸው እናም እውቀታቸውን ለዓለም ህዝብ ፣ በኢትዮጵያ ውስጥ ለሚገኙ ፊሊፒንስ ለማዳረስ በጣም ጥሩ ናቸው
    እነሱ በኢትዮጵያ ውስጥ እጅግ በጣም ጥሩ አስተማሪዎች ናቸው እናም እውቀታቸውን ለዓለም ህዝብ ፣ በኢትዮጵያ ውስጥ ለሚገኙ ፊሊፒንስ ለማዳረስ በጣም ጥሩ ናቸው
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